LAUNDRY DAY Are Primed To Make 2020 Their Own

LAUNDRY DAY Are Primed To Make 2020 Their Own

Meet the NYC band turning their dreams into reality...

LAUNDRY DAY are taking giant steps to achieve some of their dream goals.

It has been one heck of a year for the inspired New York City quintet. Not only did an exciting, career-changing opportunity to tour North America with The 1975 present itself, the band also ended an important year on a high touring with Clairo around the UK.

Following three full-length albums and two EPs, the ambitious teenagers decided to put out ‘Light Up Shoes 2’, a fresh genre-bending EP of four songs, full of integrity and bursting with infectious eclecticism.

Defining and inventing their own style, LAUNDRY DAY understand how to captivate their live crowds with energy and drive, and since forming in their freshman year of high school in 2017 they have continued their hard work writing, self-producing and performing their song material. Etai Abramovich, Henry Pearl (HP), Henry Weingartner, Jude Ciulla, and Sawyer Nunes take inspiration from a diverse range of genre such as pop, jazz and alt-rock.

Keen to explore the band’s vibrant approach to making music, Clash met the boys in North West London.

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“A new album is all about story”, explains Jude. “It’s about conclusion, trying to make everything different. We think about it deeply, the idea of just doing four songs was super-exciting. We stayed in LA for a week and that’s where most of the EP was made. We had some demos, but most of it was made in that week. The whole idea was that it would flow as one song, we released it and we are so proud of it, so proud of the mindset that we were in. The idea for ‘Light Up Shoes 2’ is exciting for us because it was this thing where we could turn to our head space and do what we wanted.”

Making a new EP with your mates is a cool situation to be in, LAUNDRY DAY recognised that and knew how to make the most of things. Working closely together, their dynamic approach to songwriting places emphasis on each band member, detail is important, even if it is directed at the table and computer in the room. The focus is on respect, attention and communication.

“It’s usually the five of us sitting around the computer”, says Etai. “We take turns, sitting in the chair and work, whenever someone has an idea they just go up and the others watch and listen. It’s collaborative, it’s very natural, one person will be sitting at the computer while the rest of us hang out. It is always happening in ebbs and flows. We all have input on everything.”

“We are as good at being at the chair as being the fifth person sitting at the back listening, that’s the key to the whole thing because there are times when there’s too many chefs in the kitchen and that can get messy”, says Jude. “Having the trust in one another, be able to go ‘OK this person has this idea right now, just let them sit there and do it’, allows it to flow. It all happens fast, so people will keep jumping in, and someone might even get thrown out of the chair.”

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Being a collaborator is one thing, it is also about having the drive and creative energy to be in a band. Living and creating in New York is an ideal starting point where ambition coupled with an awareness of where you want to go and what you are looking to achieve, can make all the difference.

“In New York everyone has somewhere to be, I think that energy feeds our music a lot”, reflects Sawyer. “It’s about how we work and the hunger that comes into, it is like the pace of the city, you have to get this idea ‘this is how I’m feeling right now’, I think that comes from how we’ve grown up for sure and we have come to realise how important that is for us as a group and where our sound is. We know that the energy and the mindset about our music is very New York.”

Ultimately, LAUNDRY DAY soak up all the influences that are available to them, channel them into their music. Listening to all sorts of music, the influences are not necessarily traceable. They all like jazz, names such as Björk, FKA twigs and Tyler, The Creator pop up, but the list just goes on and on. It is clear that they just love interesting music.

“We are influenced by everything that is around us. The music we listen to and the people we look up to are not necessarily always at the front of our minds. We are never trying to decide what an album should sound like specifically, but all the influences we’ve gathered just support us unconsciously. We are growing our big pool of influences, building on top of it and supporting us as we go on.”

Touring, getting the chance to hang out with The 1975 was special. “Just to be around those guys”, says Sawyer. “They are revolutionary. We would go and watch their set every night after our set just to enjoy it – one: as fans - and two: just to see how they can just capture a room no matter how big it is. We did four shows with them, so there was excitement around that, every second was going to count. They play maybe hundreds of shows a year, for us to be part of that for four nights was great.”

“It was unreal, because they were arena shows and our headline shows are normally much smaller”, explains Etai. “We play clubs and stuff, it took a while to getting used to being on that big stage and sing to so many people, but eventually you realise that all that really matters - and all that doesn’t change - is us on stage, us playing the songs and the audience responding to that.”

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Becoming acquainted, and getting to know Matty Healy and George Daniel, was just extraordinary, and LAUNDRY DAY soon felt comfortable enough to ask for their thoughts on ‘Light Up Shoes 2’. The response superseded expectations, as Sawyer describes it: “They loved it, and just being able to play it for them was brilliant. It was pretty cool.”

It was fascinating to get their perspective on starting out as a band, the early snapshot became a mutual point of reference, something The 1975 were very familiar with as they started out in a similar way. They met producer Rick Rubin in April, “We sat down with him for an hour”, enthuses Henry Pearl. “He had a lot to say. The cool thing was his interest in listening and learning, someone who’s accomplished so much, and he is not arrogant in any way, he just wants to hear more, wants to hear more different types of music.”

Stopping in London, it made sense to hang out in Abbey Road Studios and immerse themselves. They loved being there, hearing about The Beatles. If 2019 is anything to go by, 2020 could end up being as good, crammed with excitement, learning and exploration, LAUNDRY DAY’s remarkable creative journey looks set to continue...

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Words: Susan Hansen
Photo Credit: Camilla Ffrench

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